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Not a classic

Emerald Rocker
 
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Not a classic

Postby Emerald Rocker » Mon Feb 09, 2015 9:59 pm

Blazing Lazers doesn't break any new ground in the design department. Compile's "mech" shooters (in which you pilot a mechasuit instead of a Lazers-style spaceship) typically combined both creativity and smooth control. Lazers has nothing even nearly as striking as the bizarre-yet-intriguing storyline of Robo-Aleste, the DEEP (and still unique!) mix-and-match powerup system of Spriggan, or the inspired backgrounds of MUSHA. Blazing Lazers doesn't do any of that. But there is still hope: if a game doesn't offer something unique and different, then it can still try to do things better than the rest.

Unfortunately, not only does Blazing Lazers lack the originality needed to set it apart from the crowd, but it also lacks graphical flash. With multitudes of substandard enemies (spinning UFO's, spinning missiles, spinning turrets) or non-animated enemies that simply glide across the screen, the graphics don't help raise the adrenaline level. Well, whenever flash fails to impress, gameplay needs to step in and save the day!

Blazing Lazers is very definitely a "twitch" shooter (as opposed to cerebral): rarely must you think about HOW an enemy attacks, just assume that it will try to ram or shoot you, and avoid it. The third level is LOADED with gobs of different drones, gun-laden pillars rising from the ground, and destructible scenery. THAT is the kind of intensity needed to overcome a lack of flash and get the blood pumping!

Sadly, that third level, like the other intense spurts in the game, is mired amidst tedious moments. For example, the desert planet has a short span where Moai heads scatter bullets across the screen and Pyramids launch buckets of missiles. However, that segment comes after a long, droning sequence of "kill a few spaceships", "watch the world slowly scroll by", "destroy a pyramid or two". When you first turn on the game, the backgrounds BLAZE by underneath (a strong first impression), but most of the game meanders along at a leisurely pace. Moreover, many of the levels are extremely loooooooong, with backgrounds that "loop" (as though to increase the size of the level, they simply repeated the background twice). Perhaps the worst is the Outpost level, which plods on and on and on, with very few foes, leaving you with little else to do but enjoy the music.

And how is the music? The tunes really aren't bad, but with its cosmic, high-pitched style, it comes across as the very epitome of tinny beep-beep-boop 8-bit music.
 

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nullity
 
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Re: Not a classic

Postby nullity » Tue Feb 10, 2015 9:59 am

lol, I can't tell if you're trolling or just really really hard to impress. While you raise some valid points, much of what you say comes off as overly critical considering the game was released in 1989. I have to disagree with your overall assessment, and I challenge you to Kumite over your criticism of Blazing Lazers' music. The chip tunes are incredible and utilize sampled sounds- hardly bleeps and blips! Also, the weapons and power up system is one of the title's strengths... so many combinations to play with, and so many levels of power to make you chase those purple orbs to the end.
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majors
 
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Re: Not a classic

Postby majors » Tue Feb 10, 2015 2:16 pm

If it's trolling, he's all in for such a lengthy post. I love me some BL, but I also got it with my TG-16 back in 1990.

I love the intro music, it has a sound unique from the rest of the stage musics.
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Majors -=- Wedoca '15
 

DragonmasterDan
 
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Re: Not a classic

Postby DragonmasterDan » Thu Feb 12, 2015 10:22 am

Emerald Rocker wrote:Blazing Lazers doesn't break any new ground in the design department. Compile's "mech" shooters (in which you pilot a mechasuit instead of a Lazers-style spaceship) typically combined both creativity and smooth control. Lazers has nothing even nearly as striking as the bizarre-yet-intriguing storyline of Robo-Aleste, the DEEP (and still unique!) mix-and-match powerup system of Spriggan, or the inspired backgrounds of MUSHA. Blazing Lazers doesn't do any of that. But there is still hope: if a game doesn't offer something unique and different, then it can still try to do things better than the rest.


It's based on a Japanese movie called Gunhed. There were only so many liberties to take from a movie adaptation into a game.
http://www.veoh.com/watch/v33284512Z7qfPnkM?h1=GUNHED
 

Emerald Rocker
 
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Re: Not a classic

Postby Emerald Rocker » Thu Feb 12, 2015 12:27 pm

I'm familiar with Gunhed. The power-up system and stage designs in Blazing Lazers aren't related to the movie -- the film was not a constraint. As long as Compile kept the ship design intact, they had as much freedom as they wanted to create their own power-up system and stage designs. Which they did... and it doesn't work as well as in their other games.
 

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majors
 
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Re: Not a classic

Postby majors » Mon Feb 16, 2015 1:00 pm

In the current age of Cave- 5 level, bullet hell shmups; games like BL or 1944 are too long. Back in the 90's when you paid $55 bucks, you wanted l-o-n-g games, get your moneys worth. I think companies thoughts of length vs game play was on the length side. So they could advertise on the display boxes "15 levels!"
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Majors -=- Wedoca '15
 

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Punch
 
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Re: Not a classic

Postby Punch » Sat Feb 28, 2015 9:40 pm

Emerald, you're full of shit about Blazing Lazers.
is this real life
 


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